New-Onset Depression Following Hip Fracture Is Associated With Increased Length of Stay in Hospital and Rehabilitation Centers

A. C. Phillips, J. Upton, D. Carroll, N. Arora Duggal, J. M. Lord, Anna Phillips

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Abstract

This article examines the coincident effects of new-onset depression post hip fracture on length of hospital stay, readmission rates, and incidence of infections in older adults. Participants were 101 hip fracture patients aged 60+ years; 38 developed depressive symptoms following their fracture. Infection rates, readmissions to hospital and rehabilitation units, and length of hospital stay were assessed over the 6 months post hip fracture from hospital and general practitioner notes. Patients who developed depression by Week 6 post fracture were likely to spend more time in hospital/rehabilitation wards (p = .02) and more likely to be discharged to a rehabilitation unit (p < .05). There were no group differences in readmissions or infection rates. New-onset depression coincident with hip fracture in older adults is associated with longer hospital ward stays and greater need for rehabilitation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
JournalSAGE Open
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jun 2015

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Hip fracture
  • Length of Stay

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  • Understanding Immunesenescence.

    Whittaker, A., Duggal, N., Oyebode, J. R. & Lord, J., 18 Jul 2018, The New Dynamics of Ageing Vol II: Biological Perspectives: Biological Perspectives. Walker, A. (ed.). 1 ed. Bristol: Policy Press, Vol. 2. p. 107-130

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