Measuring and predicting individual differences in executive function at 14 months: a longitudinal study

Rory T Devine, Andrew Ribner, Claire Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
179 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study of 195 (108 boys) children seen twice during infancy (Time 1: 4.12 months; Time 2: 14.42 months) aimed to investigate the associations between and infant predictors of executive function (EF) at 14 months. Infants showed high levels of compliance with the EF tasks at 14 months. There was little evidence of cohesion among EF tasks but simple response inhibition was related to performance on two other EF tasks. Infant attention (but not parent-rated temperament) at 4 months predicted performance on two of the four EF tasks at 14 months. Results suggest that EF skills build on simpler component skills such as attention and response inhibition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e618-e636
Number of pages19
JournalChild Development
Volume90
Issue number5
Early online date21 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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