Macroscopic assessment of the quality of cold perfusion after deceased-donor kidney procurement: a United Kingdom population-based cohort study

Gangodawilage Dabare, James Hodson, Jay Nath, Adnan Sharif, Neena Kalia, Nicholas Inston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Concern regarding the quality of cold perfusion (QOP) during macroscopic assessment of procured kidneys is a common reason for discard. In the UK, QOP is routinely graded by both retrieving and implanting teams during back-bench surgery as: 1 (good), 2 (fair), 3 (poor) or 4 (patchy). We evaluated the association of this grading with organ utilization, graft outcomes, and agreement between teams. Data on all deceased-donor kidneys procured between January 2000 and December 2016 were analyzed for discard rates, while association with graft outcomes was studied in single adult transplants. Of 31,167 kidneys procured, 90.6%, 5.7%, 1.7%, and 2.1% were assigned grades 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, at retrieval. QOP was an independent risk factor of discard, with the highest rates observed in grade 3 kidneys (41.8%), compared to 6.5% in grade 1 (aOR 7.67, 95% CI 5.44-10.82, p < .001). Grading at retrieval was an independent predictor of delayed graft function (p = .019) and primary non-function (p = .001), but not long-term graft survival (p = .111). Implanting grade was an independent predictor of all three outcomes (p < .001, p < .001, and p = .002, respectively). Consistency of grading between teams was poor (Kappa = 0.179). QOP influences utilization and predicts outcomes, but a standardized and validated scoring system is required.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere14272
Number of pages12
JournalClinical transplantation
Volume35
Issue number5
Early online date27 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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