Lifetime stressor exposure and psychophysiological reactivity and habituation to repeated acute social stressors

Ella Mcloughlin*, Rachel Arnold, Paul Freeman, James Turner, Gareth Roberts, David Fletcher, George M. Slavich, Lee Moore

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study addressed whether lifetime stressor exposure was associated with psychophysiological reactivity and habituation to a novel laboratory-based stressor. Eighty-six participants (Mage = 23.31 years, SD = 4.94) reported their exposure to lifetime non-sport and sport-specific stressors before completing two consecutive trials of the Trier Social Stress Test, while cardiovascular (i.e., heart rate) and endocrine (i.e., salivary cortisol) data were recorded. Exposure to a moderate number of lifetime non-sport and sport-specific stressors was associated with adaptive cardiovascular reactivity, whereas very low or very high stressor exposure was related to maladaptive reactivity. Moreover, experiencing a very low number of lifetime non-sport (but not sport-specific) stressors was associated with poorer habituation. In contrast, lifetime stressor severity was unrelated to cardiovascular reactivity. Finally, greater lifetime non-sport and sport-specific stressor counts were associated with blunted cortisol reactivity and poorer habituation. These results suggest that lifetime stressor exposure may influence sport performers’ acute stress responses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427–438
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Volume44
Issue number6
Early online date30 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

G.M.S. was supported by grant #OPR21101 from the California Governor’s Office of 22 Planning and Research/California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine. These 23 organizations had no role in designing or planning this study; in collecting, analyzing, or 24 interpreting the data; in writing the article; or in deciding to submit this article for publication

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Lifetime stressor exposure and psychophysiological reactivity and habituation to repeated acute social stressors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this