Influence of topography and large-scale forcing on the occurrence of katabatic flow jumps in Anatartica: Idealized simulations

Y yU, Xiaoming Cai, XS Qie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), which is a non-hydrostatic numerical model, has been used to investigate the impact of terrain shape and large-scale forcing on the Antarctic surface-wind regime, focusing on their roles in establishing favorable flow conditions for the formation of katabatic flow jumps. A series of quasi-21) numerical simulations were conducted over idealized slopes representing the slopes of Antarctica during austral winter conditions. Results indicate that the steepness and variations of the underlying slope play a role in the evolution of near-surface flows and thus the formation of katabatic flow jumps. However, large-scale forcing has a more noticeable effect on the occurrence of this small-scale phenomenon by establishing essential upstream and downstream flow conditions, including the upstream supercritical flow, the less stably stratified or unstable layer above the cold katabatic layer, as well as the cold-air pool located near the foot of the slope through an interaction with the underlying topography. Thus, the areas with steep and abrupt change in slopes, e.g. near the coastal areas of the eastern Antarctic, are preferred locations for the occurrence of katabatic flow jumps, especially under supporting synoptic conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)819-832
Number of pages14
JournalAdvances in Atmospheric Science
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2007

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