Fossils: (re)enactment and ‘remembering’ as a mode of documentation

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

I want to suggest that practice as research has a different agenda to that of professional practice. Practice as research documentation is required to be ontological, ethnographic and epistemic in order to contribute to knowledge communities in a rigorous manner; particularly within the context of doctoral study and the HE environment. Ontological in that it must be framed as research, the research agenda authorising and contextualising the practice. It is ethnographic in that the performance and its documentation/theorisation chart a knowledge acquisition process in a critical and reflexive manner. Epistemic because the practice is a way of knowing and is a research methodology to uncover insight. I am not suggesting that professional practice cannot/ does not necessarily do this but in order to be understood specifically as practice as research for most of the major awards and funding bodies, its framing as research must be explicit and rigorous. Documentation is a central to PaR practice as it is to professional practice but for distinctly different reasons. I want to share the ontology of the epistemic approach to performance documentation that I undertook for my doctoral research and its dissemination. I want to start by outlining the research and documentation challenges that the research presented in order to discuss the ways in which the website presented an epistemic dissemination solution. I want to start by briefly outlining the project with the specific documentation challenges that it presented and then discuss the ways in which the website offered a performative dissemination solution.
Original languageUndefined/Unknown
Title of host publicationNew researchers' network 2nd annual symposium
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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