Foot rotation contribution to trunk and gaze stability during whole-body mediated gaze shifts: a principal component analysis study

S Sklavos, D Anastasopoulos, N Ziavra, M Hollands, A Bronstein, Mark Hollands

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Large gaze displacements are mediated by combined motion of the eye, head, trunk, and foot. We applied principal component analysis (PCA) to examine the degree of variability and linearity in the angular velocity pattern of the various segments involved that participate in this task. Ten normal subjects stood up and had to visually fixate and realign their bodies with LED targets separated 45 degrees apart, ranging from +/- 45 to 360 degrees. The outbound movement in this paradigm is unpredictable whereas the return (inbound) movement occurs under spatially predictable conditions. Under such predictable conditions, subjects generate in approximately 15% of the trials gaze shifts, with periods of fairly constant high gaze velocity (single-step gaze shifts). PCA showed that gaze velocity variability did not change if the feet were rotating or not. Foot velocity was variable and showed additional PCs suggestive of non-linear motion components. Trunk and head-in-space velocity showed intermediate levels of variability but its variability decreased during the foot stepping movements. The results suggest that the feet, trunk, and head are less tightly controlled by the central nervous system than gaze velocity. Movements of the feet seem to aid trunk stability and motion rather than gaze control.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Brain Research: Using Eye Movements as an Experimental Probe of Brain function - A Symposium in Honor of Jean Büttner-Ennever
Volume171
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2008

Keywords

  • principal component analysis
  • coordination
  • gaze
  • posture

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Foot rotation contribution to trunk and gaze stability during whole-body mediated gaze shifts: a principal component analysis study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this