Exploring the role of ‘shadowing’ as a beneficial preparatory step for sensitive qualitative research with children and young people with serious health conditions

Natalie Tyldesley-Marshall, Sheila Greenfield, Susan Neilson, Jenny Adamski, Sharon Beardsmore, Martin English, Andrew Peet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

102 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article aims to explore and record the role of shadowing in preparation for a qualitative study involving children and families with sensitive health issues. The researcher was engaged for a study involving qualitative research involving paediatric patients (those under 18 years old) and their families, but was unfamiliar with a hospital environment and interviewing children and young people (CYP) with a serious health condition. The researcher ‘shadowed’ healthcare professionals (HCPs) at a children’s hospital during their day-to-day work in order to prepare for the research interviewing. From shadowing, the researcher gained: familiarity with a hospital environment, organisational processes, and medical terminology; an understanding of the appropriate ways to refer to patients; confidence and competence in talking to children with serious health conditions; and resilience to becoming upset during interviews while hearing patients’ distressing stories—they became ‘desensitised’. Shadowing can therefore be highly beneficial for researchers undertaking research in unfamiliar contexts, environments, and populations prior to interviewing.
Original languageEnglish
Article number14
Number of pages14
JournalSocieties
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • shadowing
  • qualitative research
  • research methodology
  • CYP
  • paediatric patients
  • interviews;
  • sensitive research
  • chronic illness
  • brain tumours

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring the role of ‘shadowing’ as a beneficial preparatory step for sensitive qualitative research with children and young people with serious health conditions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this