Does tea consumption during early pregnancy have an adverse effect on birth outcomes?

Jin-Hua Lu, Jian-Rong He, Song-Ying Shen , Xue-Ling Wei, Nian-Nian Chen, Ming-Yang Yuan, Lan Qiu, Wei-Dong Lei, Qiao-Zhu Chen, Cui-Yue Hu, Hui-Min Xia, Suzanne Bartington, Kar Cheng, , King Bong Hubert Lam, Qiu Xiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
275 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background Tea, a common beverage, has been suggested to exhibit a number of health benefits. However, one of its active ingredients, caffeine, has been associated with preterm birth and low birthweight. We investigated whether tea consumption during early pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth and abnormal foetal growth. Methods A total of 8775 pregnant women were included from the Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study. Tea consumption (type, frequency and strength) during their first trimester and social and demographic factors were obtained via questionnaires administered during pregnancy. Information on birth outcomes and complications during pregnancy was obtained from hospital medical records.Results Overall habitual tea drinking (≥1 serving/week) prevalence among pregnant women was low, at 16%. After adjustment for potential confounding factors (e.g. maternal age, educational level, monthly income) tea drinking during early pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, small or large for gestational age (p>0.05).Conclusions We did not identify a consistent association between frequency of tea consumption or tea strength and adverse birth outcomes among Chinese pregnant women with low tea consumption. Our findings suggest that occasional tea drinking during pregnancy is not associated with increased risk of preterm birth or abnormal foetal growth. Given the high overall number of annual births in China, our findings have important public health significance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-289
JournalBirth
Volume44
Issue number3
Early online date21 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

Keywords

  • Tea
  • Preterm birth
  • Abnormal foetal growth
  • Chinese
  • Birth cohort

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Does tea consumption during early pregnancy have an adverse effect on birth outcomes?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.
  • The Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study (BIGCS)

    Xiu, Q., Lu, J-H., He, J-R., Lam, K. H., Shen, S-Y., Guo, Y., Kuang, Y-S., Yuan, M-Y., Qiu, L., Chen, N-N., Lu, M-S., Li, W-D., Xing, Y-F., Bartington, S., Zhou, F-J., Cheng, K. & Xia, H-M., Apr 2017, In: European Journal of Epidemiology. 32, 4, p. 337–346

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Open Access
    File
    26 Citations (Scopus)
    378 Downloads (Pure)

Cite this