Diverse Diversions: Youth Justice Reform, Localized Practices, and a ‘New Interventionist Diversion’?

L. Kelly, V. Armitage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)
32 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The recent resurgence of practices aimed at ‘diverting’ young people from prosecution appears to suggest a sea change from the interventionism which characterized New Labour’s approach to young law-breakers. Drawing on interviews with youth justice practitioners at two sites in England, we argue this is overly simplistic, since the ‘interventionist diversion’ they describe reflects the continued influence of New Labour reforms, as well as older approaches. We conclude that more empirical research is needed to establish where such interventions sit within the broader – and increasingly localized – landscape of support provision, as well as the consequences of providing ‘welfare’ in this way.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-133
Number of pages17
JournalYouth Justice
Volume15
Issue number2
Early online date21 Nov 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2015

Keywords

  • crime prevention
  • diversion
  • early intervention
  • localism
  • welfare

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