Developing novel biointerfaces: using chlorhexidine surface attachment as a method for creating anti-fungal surfaces

Jack Bryant, Lily Riordan, Rowan Watson, Naa Dei Nikoi, Wioleta Trzaska, Louise Slope, Callum Tibbatts, Morgan R. Alexander, David J. Scurr, Robin May, Felicity De Cogan

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Abstract

There is an increasing focus in healthcare environments on combatting antimicrobial resistant infections. While bacterial infections are well reported, infections caused by fungi receive less attention, yet have a broad impact on society and can be deadly. Fungi are eukaryotes with considerable shared biology with humans, therefore limited technologies exist to combat fungal infections and hospital infrastructure is rarely designed for reducing microbial load. In this study, a novel antimicrobial surface (AMS) that is modified with the broad-spectrum biocide chlorhexidine is reported. The surfaces are shown to kill the opportunistic fungal pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans very rapidly (<15 min) and are significantly more effective than current technologies available on the commercial market, such as silver and copper.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2100138
Number of pages6
JournalGlobal Challenges
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Mar 2022

Bibliographical note

© 2022 The Authors. Global Challenges published by Wiley‐VCH GmbH.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial surfaces
  • fungi
  • surface coatings

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