Commentary on "Autism, oxytocin and interoception": Alexithymia, not Autism Spectrum Disorders, is the consequence of interoceptive failure

Rebecca Brewer*, Francesca Happé, Richard Cook, Geoffrey Bird

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In "Autism, oxytocin and interoception" (Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 47, 410-430) Quattrocki and Friston present their theory of the role of oxytocin in interoception from multiple perspectives. The arguments contained therein are compelling, and highlight the fact that interoception, and the role of oxytocin in interoception, should receive more research attention. However, in addition to outlining the role of oxytocin in interoception the authors also suggest that Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a result of a failure of this system. It is this latter claim that we disagree with, instead suggesting that alexithymia, rather than autism, is most accurately characterised as a general failure of interoception. We review positive evidence that alexithymia produces several of the deficits identified as indicating a failure of interoception, and negative evidence that ASD (in the absence of comorbid alexithymia) is associated with these deficits. We highlight implications for the model, for oxytocin research, and for the clinical management of psychiatric conditions more generally.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)348-353
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience and biobehavioral reviews
Volume56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords

  • Alexithymia
  • Autism
  • Emotion recognition
  • Empathy
  • Imitation
  • Interoception
  • Oxytocin
  • Predictive coding
  • Theory of mind

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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