Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus phosphoglucose isomerase structures reveal novel rigidity in the active site of a selected subset of enzymes upon substrate binding

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Abstract

Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis are central pathways of metabolism across all domains of life. A prominent enzyme in these pathways is phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), which mediates the interconversion of glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus leads a complex life cycle, switching between intraperiplasmic replicative and extracellular 'hunter' attack-phase stages. Passage through this complex life cycle involves different metabolic states. Here we present the unliganded and substrate-bound structures of the B. bacteriovorus PGI, solved to 1.74 Å and 1.67 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that an induced-fit conformational change within the active site is not a prerequisite for the binding of substrates in some PGIs. Crucially, we suggest a phenylalanine residue, conserved across most PGI enzymes but substituted for glycine in B. bacteriovorus and other select organisms, is central to the induced-fit mode of substrate recognition for PGIs. This enzyme also represents the smallest conventional PGI characterized to date and probably represents the minimal requirements for a functional PGI.

Original languageEnglish
Article number210098
JournalOpen Biology
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100
  • phosphoglucose isomerase
  • glucose-6- phosphate
  • fructose-6-phosphate
  • glycolysis
  • metabolism

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