A tale of two cities: Multiplexed banking access in Birmingham and London

Andra Sonea, Weisi Guo, Stephen Jarvis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Accessibility to banking is rapidly changing due to the onset of new digital technologies. In urban areas, multiple overlapping banking channels are available, ranging from physical ATMs to digital broadband. However, city scale analysis of accessibility to different demographic groups is lacking. Understanding this can inform smart city design and prioritize the deployment of digital infrastructure, whilst delaying any decommissioning of legacy physical branches. Here, for the first time, we present a short paper on our analysis of UK's two largest cities, showing different banking accessibility results and their relation to social electronic inclusion classes. In particular, we show how poor accessibility occurs in areas with higher retired demographics and near social deprivation, and how the urban population of Birmingham and London are better equipped and more socially ready for digital transformation than rural areas.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication5th IEEE International Smart Cities Conference, ISC2 2019
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages551-554
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781728108469
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019
Event5th IEEE International Smart Cities Conference, ISC2 2019 - Casablanca, Morocco
Duration: 14 Oct 201917 Oct 2019

Publication series

Name5th IEEE International Smart Cities Conference, ISC2 2019

Conference

Conference5th IEEE International Smart Cities Conference, ISC2 2019
Country/TerritoryMorocco
CityCasablanca
Period14/10/1917/10/19

Keywords

  • banking
  • consumer
  • digital access
  • GIS
  • urban analytics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Urban Studies
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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