A multicenter evaluation of comprehensive analysis of MLL translocations and fusion gene partners in acute leukemia using the MLL FusionChip device

CJ Harrison, Michael Griffiths, FN Moorman, S Schnittger, JM Cayuela, S Shurtleff, E Gottardi, G Mitterbauer, D Colomer, E Delabesse, V Castéras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rearrangements of the MLL gene are significant in acute leukemia. Among the most frequent translocations are t(4;11)(q21;q23) and t(9;11)(p22;q23), which give rise to the MLL-AFF1 and MLL-MLLT3 fusion genes (alias MLL-AF4 and MLL-AF9) in acute lymphoblastic and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively. Current evidence suggests that determining the MLL status of acute leukemia, including precise identification of the partner gene, is important in defining appropriate treatment. This underscores the need for accurate detection methods. A novel molecular diagnostic device, the MLL FusionChip, has been successfully used to identify MLL fusion gene translocations in acute leukemia, including the precise breakpoint location. This study evaluated the performance of the MLL FusionChip within a routine clinical environment, comprising nine centers worldwide, in the analysis of 21 control and 136 patient samples. It was shown that the assay allowed accurate detection of the MLL fusion gene, regardless of the breakpoint location, and confirmed that this multiplex approach was robust in a global multicenter trial. The MLL FusionChip was shown to be superior to other detection methods. The type of molecular information provided by MLL FusionChip gave an indication of the appropriate primers to design for disease monitoring of MLL patients following treatment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-22
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Genetics and Cytogenetics
Volume173
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2007

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